Practicing — and Reading — Revision in Tutor Education Courses

Tisha Turk is Associate Professor of English and Writing Center Director at the University of Minnesota, Morris, and a 2005 graduate of UW-Madison (PhD, English), where she served for two years as Assistant Director of the Writing Fellows Program.

Tisha Turk is Associate Professor of English and Writing Center Director at the University of Minnesota, Morris, and a 2005 graduate of UW-Madison (PhD, English), where she served for two years as Assistant Director of the Writing Fellows Program.

This semester, I’ve been thinking a lot about revision. Well, okay, I always think a lot about revision; it’s essential to my writing center work, my classroom teaching, and my own writing (I am the queen of Shitty First Drafts, as described in the second chapter of Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird). But lately I’ve been thinking about it even more than usual. Specifically, I’ve been thinking about how important it is to ask writing consultants — tutors, writing fellows, writing center instructors, even teachers — to do, on a regular basis, the kinds of things we ask writers to do: to share and revise our own work.

I mean, let’s face it: writing is hard, and sharing writing is hard, and accepting comments on writing is really hard, and revising… you get the picture. But these are the things that we ask writers to do all the time. And while I think there is value in normalizing those activities (“Of course I’m asking you to read your paper out loud, everybody does that here, it’s no big deal”), I also think there is value in remembering that for a lot of writers this stuff is difficult and intimidating and counterintuitive, because remembering that will make us more sympathetic and generous in our comments and interactions, and it will also allow us to speak with the conviction of personal experience when we say “Look, I know this revision thing sucks, but it is so worth it.”

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