Crossing the Barrier: Advocating for Students, Educating Faculty

By Alexandra Asche

Alexandra Asche

Alexandra Asche. Photo by Kari Adams.

Alexandra Asche is the Student Assistant Director at the Writing Center of the University of Minnesota, Morris, a public liberal arts college. She works with Director Tisha Turk, who served as a UW-Madison Writing Center instructor and Assistant Director of the Writing Fellows Program while earning her PhD. Alexandra has been a consultant in UMM’s Writing Center since 2014 and the editor-in-chief of the campus newspaper since 2015. In her spare time, she studies English and Psychology.

When I first started planning this post, I intended to write about the UMM Writing Center’s formal outreach to faculty. However, as I looked through the previous posts on this blog, I found that others have already written about how to plan this sort of outreach. I also noticed, though, that I was in the peculiar position of being a student consultant and administrator attempting to educate professors who, to say the least, vary highly in their degrees of interest and investment in our small campus writing center.

(more…)

Using Peer Writing Groups For the Senior Thesis and Beyond

By Rebecca Steffy

Author Photo by Carrie Castree.

Author Photo by Carrie Castree.

Rebecca Couch Steffy is a Ph.D. candidate in Literary Studies at UW-Madison, where she also serves as a TA Coordinator for The Writing Center and Co-Director of the English 100 Tutorial Program. Her research focuses on the relationships between community formations and aesthetics in contemporary poetry and performance. 

This year, I have the privilege of coordinating the UW-Madison Writing Center’s Senior Thesis Writing Groups, small peer-led writing groups that meet weekly or bi-weekly throughout the daunting semester- or year-long process of writing a senior thesis. I help spread the word that senior thesis writing groups are forming at the beginning of each term, lead orientation meetings to better inform interested students about how the groups work, and facilitate the first meeting of each group to guide them in establishing a set of shared expectations for working together. Then I keep in touch throughout the semester by email or a shared check-in document, and by dropping by another meeting later in the semester. Our model aims at maximizing the rich benefits of writing groups for senior thesis writers with a minimum of direct instructional hours from our staff. (more…)

Water Damage, Writing Technologies, and Alternative Modes of Feedback

By Kathleen Daly

Kathleen Daly is a PhD student in Composition and Rhetoric and is currently serving as the Assistant Director of the Writing Across the Curriculum Program at UW-Madison. Her doctoral research looks at technologies that underwrite digital archive projects in order to explore questions of archival materiality, accessibility and discoverability.

Kathleen Daly is a PhD student in Composition and Rhetoric and is currently serving as the Assistant Director of the Writing Across the Curriculum Program at UW-Madison. Her doctoral research looks at technologies that underwrite digital archive projects in order to explore questions of archival materiality, accessibility and discoverability.

Kathleen Daly

Two weeks ago, I spilled water on my laptop. Despite my frantic attempts to dry it off, a few drops of water seeped in through the keyboard and into the internal components, rendering my computer entirely useless. While I wait for my computer to be repaired, I have been taking advantage of the Equipment Checkout System (ECS) available through UW InfoLabs. Through ECS, I am able to rent a laptop that is the exact same make and model as my personal computer. However, these laptops have a loan period of only three days with no options for renewal. This means that every three days, I have to check out a different machine.

(more…)

Access as a Lens for Peer Tutoring

By Annika Konrad

Annika Konrad is a Ph.D. Candidate in Composition and Rhetoric and an Assistant Director of the Writing Fellows Program at UW-Madison. Her doctoral research focuses on the rhetorical practices that blind and visually impaired people use to gain access. When Annika was an undergraduate at UW-Madison, she was a Writing Fellow.

Annika Konrad is a Ph.D. Candidate in Composition and Rhetoric and an Assistant Director of the Writing Fellows Program at UW-Madison. Her doctoral research focuses on the rhetorical practices that blind and visually impaired people use to gain access. When she was an undergraduate, Annika was a Writing Fellow at UW-Madison.

Photo credit: Annika Konrad

“Why didn’t we start with access?” one student asked during a discussion near the end of the semester in English 403, an honors seminar for new UW-Madison undergraduate Writing Fellows. Writing Fellows at UW-Madison are trained undergraduates who serve as peer writing tutors in courses across disciplines. As a first time teacher of the course, I had added a day to the end of the course focused on disability, a move that I knew was not ideal for treating difference. While disability is often excluded from lists of disadvantaged groups, scholars in disability studies have long warned that access should not be approached as accommodating “problemed bodies” (Yergeau et al, 2013), but instead as an effort that requires and benefits all parties (Dolmage, 2014; Price; 2011). I was worried, then, about tacking disability onto the end of the calendar. (more…)

Rethinking Patience

By Rachel Azima

Rachel and Cameron

Rachel and Cameron at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo

Rachel Azima is the director of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Writing Center.  While completing her Ph.D. in English, she worked for 13 semesters in the UW-Madison Writing Center. 

When I took my first writing center director position, I inherited a set of interview questions that I have continued to tweak, semester by semester. One question I have retained is one I imagine many folks might ask prospective consultants: what are some qualities you feel a consultant should have (and, as a follow-up, how do you embody them)?

An answer I have often received—and that tends to make me wince a little—is “patience.” This probably seems like an odd response to get hung up on; “patience” is one of those words that seems pretty reliably positive. It reminds me of “community” in Joseph Harris’s “The Idea of Community in the Study of Writing,” in which he invokes Raymond Williams’ discussion of community as a term that “seems never to be used unfavourably” (13). (more…)

Tutoring Sessions as Safe Spaces: Affective Writing and the personal Personal Statement

By Julia Meuse

Julia Meuse has been a tutor at the Writing Center since fall of 2012. She is also a PhD candidate in English literary studies writing a dissertation about office spaces and white-collar labor in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature.

Julia Meuse

Julia Meuse

The term “safe space” has entered the popular American lexicon in recent years, nowhere more prominently than in institutes of higher education. College campuses around the country have taken laudable steps towards creating spaces where LGBTQ students, women, students of color, and members of other marginalized communities can feel comfortable freely expressing themselves in a tolerant and welcoming environment. Writing centers are in some ways safe spaces by necessity; the very nature of our work demands it. Successful tutoring sessions are more likely to occur when the student feels at ease discussing their work. The Writing Center here at the University of Wisconsin-Madison takes seriously its commitment to ensuring all student-writers feel comfortable expressing themselves and we’re continually working to enhance our tutorial practices in a way that cultivates student empowerment.
(more…)

Where the Humanities Meet the Sciences: The Impact of Writing Center Instruction on Students in the Sciences and Their Careers

By Ambar Meneses-Hall

Ambar Meneses-Hall

Ambar Meneses-Hall

Ambar Meneses-Hall has been a Writing Center tutor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison since fall of 2015. She is also a PhD candidate and dissertator in English literary studies, with a focus on American and African American Literature.

“I believe that the work that we do changes lives,” says Amy Huseby, an experienced writing tutor and Outreach Coordinator for the Writing Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

As another Writing Center tutor and student I could not agree more. Amy has many good stories about the positive impact that Writing Center instruction has on UW students from all majors and walks of life, but one in particular stands out. Amy has worn many hats at the Writing Center; she has been a Skype instructor, an e-mail instructor, an Outreach instructor, and a Main Center and Satellite instructor. She is currently the Coordinator for the Writing Center Outreach program. Here is the story that will melt any cynic’s heart: (more…)

How We [Actually] Write: Neurodiversity, Writing Process, and Writing Instruction

Leah Pope

By Leah Pope

Leah Pope has been a Writing Center tutor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison since fall of 2014. She is also a PhD candidate in English literary studies, writing a dissertation that explores representations of disability and bodily difference in Anglo-Saxon England.

Alexandra Gillespie opens her essay in How We Write: Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blank Page by confessing that she only writes when she has to [1]. “Because reasons” (19). She writes this casually, as if she’s not breaking my mind by using Internet diction. But it’s not just her delightful, playful writing style — shared by many of the essays in this collection — that is revealing. Gillespie describes anxious and determined binge writing, fueled by deadlines ranging from a DPhil advisor’s note asking to have coffee — how terrifying! — to a paper promised to a friend/colleague for review. She describes writing 6,000 words in one day to meet a deadline — not drivel, mind you, but a conference paper and later the core of a book chapter. (more…)

Teaming Up: A Collaboration between the Writing Center and the Library

By Nancy Linh Karls and Barbara Sisolak

Nancy Linh Karls is a senior instructor in the UW-Madison Writing Center, where she serves as its science-writing specialist. She also leads and teaches the Mellon-Wisconsin Dissertation Writing Camps and coordinates the community-based Madison Writing Assistance program. Barbara Sisolak is a senior academic librarian with Steenbock Library, where she provides reference and instruction to library patrons. As Instruction Coordinator, she manages Steenbock Library’s information literacy instruction program in alignment with the UW Libraries Teaching and Learning Programs office.

Barbara Sisolak

Barbara Sisolak

(more…)

A Game of Solitaire with Many Players: US Writing Centers from a German Perspective

By Stephanie Dreyfürst

Stephanie Dreyfürst, founder and director of the Writing Center at Frankfurt’s Goethe-University, holds a PhD in Early Modern German Literature. She is interested in everything that has to do with (academic) writing, reading, and thinking. Her favorite areas of research include WAC/WID programs, genre, rhetorics, and the acquisition of academic writing competency. She’s an avid lover of opera and a proud member of the board of the German Skeptics.

Recently, I was on a six-week long research trip which led me to different Writing Centers in the US. My main focus was on researching the effects the local Writing Fellow programs have on faculty, students, and the writing fellows themselves. But aside from that task, I couldn’t help noticing the similarities and differences between different Writing Center “cultures” in the States and in Germany. When I came to my first stop (the über-impressive Writing Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison), I was welcomed with incredible warmth and open arms. Three wonderful colleagues from two other German Writing Centers (Viadrina University Frankfurt (Oder) and Leibniz University Hannover) were also staying at UW Madison at the same time. The amount of work that Bradley Hughes and his team had put into the preparation of our visit was immense: We felt like members of the team immediately and were able to talk to many incredibly interesting people and learn a lot. (more…)