Overview: Designing Effective Assignments

Writing Assignments in Anthropology 490

Author: 
Karen Strier
Description: 
Focusing on the point, structure, audience, topic, and format for course papers, anthropologist Karen Strier advises her students about writing the one and five-page papers for her writing-intensive senior seminar.

This is a writing intensive course, which means frequent writing assignments, lots of feedback, opportunities to work on both the content of your papers and how you communicate your knowledge and i

Astronomy 236 Writing Assignments

Author: 
Eric Wilcots

Professor Eric Wilcots teaches a Communication-B course titled "The History of Matter in the Universe." His course Web site includes details about the four writing assignments.

Sample Rubric for Problem Reports and Reflections in a Math Course

Author: 
Jamie Sutherland, Mathematics Department, UW-Madison
Description: 
In this example, the instructor carefully explains the purpose of two different kinds of assignments and uses the rubric to identify the specific traits of strong papers.

Math 130 Sutherland

Lecture 1&2 Spring 2005

 

A Guide to Writing in Math 130

 

Daniel Hausman's Model Philosophy Paper

Author: 
Daniel Hausman
Description: 
On the Web site for his course on Contemporary Moral Issues, Professor Daniel Hausman offers students general commentary on their first papers and illustrates his points with a model paper.

On the Web site for his course on Contemporary Moral Issues, Professor Daniel Hausman offers students general commentary on their first papers and illustrates his points with a model paper.

A Comm-B History 200 Syllabus

Author: 
Charles L. Cohen
Description: 
In the following syllabus, Professor Charles Cohen introduces his course, articulates his goals for his students, clarifies the place of a Writing Fellow in a Comm-B course, and outlines his paper assignments. Under "minor assignments", note how Professor Cohen gives a series of 50 word (that's right. . . only *50* word!) writing assignments. These assignments not only mean less grading time for the professor and TAs; they force students to gain the invaluable skill of writing to the heart of the matter on a particular topic.

This course is intended to make you into an historian—which is not the same thing as knowing where Nathaniel Bacon slept or how many commas Hamilton used in the 27th Federalist Paper.

The required readings consist of two packets designed specifically for this course. They are available from the Humanities Copy Center, 1650 Humanities Building:

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